Neil Venketramen: Couples and Family Therapist

Couples and Family Therapy with Neil

Neil Venketramen

  • "I love you, but I'm not in love with you."

"I love you, but I'm not in love with you."

Thursday 10th January 2019

Learn from couples and family therapist Neil Venketramen and guest Dr. Cheryl Rampage how to rekindle the intimacy and introduce novelty into your long-term romantic relationship on alcoholfree.com.
24 minutes
Informative
Empowering
Thought-provoking
Encouraging
Authentic

About this podcast

Couples and Family Therapy with Neil
Author:
Neil Venketramen: Couples and Family Therapist
Overview:
Categories:
Relationships
Family and Children
Mental Health
Addiction
Alcohol
Self-Help
Personal Recovery Stories
Links:
Visit site
Episodes:
1 (View all)

Rekindling the Spark: What to Do When Your Partner Says 'I Love You, But I'm Not in Love With You'

When someone says I love you but I'm not in love, they're saying it must be a problem with you, because otherwise why wouldn't I stay in love with you, not realizing that it is a time-limited experience in almost every case.
In this episode of Couples and Family Therapy with Neil, therapist Neil Venketramen and guest Dr. Cheryl Rampage discuss the common issue of emotional disconnection in long-term relationships. One of the biggest challenges couples face is when one partner says 'I love you, but I'm not in love with you.' Dr. Rampage explains that this statement is often a result of the misconception that being in love is a perpetual state, when in reality it is a time-limited experience. She also explores what couples therapy can do to help partners rekindle intimacy and introduce novelty into their relationship.
One important step in overcoming emotional disconnection in a relationship is acknowledging that something is wrong. It's essential to avoid shaming your partner and instead respond with empathy and a willingness to work on the relationship. Dr. Rampage emphasizes the importance of verbal intimacy as a way to introduce novelty into a long-term relationship. Simple actions like expressing gratitude and sharing your feelings with your partner can make a big difference.
Couples may also face roadblocks when trying to introduce novelty into their relationship. A therapist can help partners understand these roadblocks and find ways to overcome them. Dr. Rampage notes that when trying to change, there are only three things that people can change: their actions, their thoughts, and their feelings. Starting with small changes in actions can lead to significant improvements in a relationship.
Finally, Dr. Rampage shares some of the keys to sustaining a long-term romantic relationship. Introducing novelty has been an essential part of her own relationship, and she encourages couples to find ways to create new experiences together. Whether it's trying a new activity or seeing things from a different perspective, introducing novelty can help keep the spark alive in a long-term relationship.
Listen to the full episode on alcoholfree.com to learn more about how to rekindle the spark in your long-term relationship.